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International & Comparative Intellectual Property - LAWS8016
 Law Books

 
Faculty: Faculty of Law
 
 
School:  Faculty of Law
 
 
Course Outline: See below
 
 
Campus: Kensington Campus
 
 
Career: Postgraduate
 
 
Units of Credit: 6
 
 
EFTSL: 0.12500 (more info)
 
 
Indicative Contact Hours per Week: 2
 
 
Enrolment Requirements:
 
 
Prerequisite: Academic Program must be either 9200 or 9210 or 5740 or 9230 or 5265 or 9231 or 5231 or 9220 or 5750.
 
 
CSS Contribution Charge:Band 3 (more info)
 
   
 
Further Information: See Class Timetable
 
  

Description

This course has been designed to give postgraduate students an overview of intellectual property in the international context. It will cover some of the fundamental principles governing the international regulation of intellectual property, including a study of the content and operation of major international agreements. It will also explore the role of intellectual property as a tool of world trade and assess the dispute settlement procedures under the WTO TRIPS Agreement. In addition, it will assess the role and impact of global industry and non-governmental organisations in shaping intellectual property policy, as well as considering controversial issues such as the regulation of biotechnology, electronic commerce and the impact of intellectual property on the environment and human rights.


LLM Specialisation

Recommended Prior Knowledge

This course assumes a working knowledge of intellectual property based on study at undergraduate level or through completion of the postgraduate course LAWS8017 Intellectual Property Law. You will be expected to have an overview of intellectual property law and/or to have read a recent IP textbook such as Davison et al, Australian Intellectual Property Law (2nd ed) (Cambridge University Press, 2011) or Stewart et al, Intellectual Property in Australia (4th ed) (LexisNexis, 2010) and IP casebook such as Bowrey et al, Australian Intellectual Property: Commentary, Law and Practice (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Graduate Diploma of Applied Intellectual Property students are expected to have a working knowledge of intellectual property based on study of the postgraduate course LAWS8046 Intellectual Property Law and Innovation.

Course Objectives

A candidate who has successfully completed this subject should:
  • Understand the content and operation of the major international instruments regulating intellectual property
  • Understand the political and economic factors shaping international intellectual property policy
  • Appreciate the importance of intellectual property in the context of world trade and development
  • Have an understanding of the impact of relevant WTO dispute settlement jurisprudence
  • Be aware of some of the major policy debates and emerging trends and themes in the international intellectual property context

Main Topics

  • The international framework of intellectual property law: understanding relevant agreements and other instruments
  • The link between intellectual property and trade, development and human rights
  • WTO TRIPS jurisprudence
  • Current policy issues relating to international intellectual property

Assessment

Research Plan 10%
Research Essay (7,000 words) 70%
Class Participation 20%

Course Texts

Texts and resources for this course will be listed approximately 1 month prior to class commencing.

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© The University of New South Wales (CRICOS Provider No.: 00098G), 2004-2011. The information contained in this Handbook is indicative only. While every effort is made to keep this information up-to-date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary arrangements, programs and courses at any time without notice and at its discretion. While the University will try to avoid or minimise any inconvenience, changes may also be made to programs, courses and staff after enrolment. The University may also set limits on the number of students in a course.