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Environment and Development - IEST5007
 Environment

   
   
   
 
Campus: Kensington Campus
 
 
Career: Postgraduate
 
 
Units of Credit: 6
 
 
EFTSL: 0.12500 (more info)
 
 
Indicative Contact Hours per Week: 30
 
 
CSS Contribution Charge:Band 2 (more info)
 
   
 
Further Information: See Class Timetable
 
  

Description

The course would focus on the inherent environmental challenges that face the “developing world”, including a critique of neoliberal models of economic growth and development. The subject takes an international perspective, focusing on the role of environmental conventions and the impact of global governance strategies, such as the ‘millennium development goals ‘, in achieving a more sustainable approach to
development. This subject would be of particular interest to students interested in international governance, the role of civil society, and government in developing countries. Topics would include: International
development frameworks and governance; International trade, environment and development; Food security - the green and gene revolutions; Energy and development; Cimate change implications for the developing
world; Indigenous rights and gender – their role in environmental management; Debt, poverty and the environment; Community participation in development; and related topics.


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© The University of New South Wales (CRICOS Provider No.: 00098G), 2004-2011. The information contained in this Handbook is indicative only. While every effort is made to keep this information up-to-date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary arrangements, programs and courses at any time without notice and at its discretion. While the University will try to avoid or minimise any inconvenience, changes may also be made to programs, courses and staff after enrolment. The University may also set limits on the number of students in a course.